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Blog Archive 2017-2018

11th March 2018

Most practising Catholics know what is expected and required of us during the season of Lent: prayer, fasting and almsgiving. We talk about giving something up for Lent, we want to make Lent special. I would imagine that I am similar to most Catholics in that I find this quite a challenge. If it was not a challenge then it would not be worth the endeavour!

This Lent I have taken it upon myself to improve the spiritual journey for our students, at the moment we are without a chaplain to provide resources, so I have stepped into the void. Each week I source a video clip which I hope will help students focus on the relevance of this important season. I have also made a commitment to  double the number of ‘Headteacher’s Blogs’, I know many parents like to read these. (This is now the third since the beginning of Lent, I am aiming for Six.) For me this presents a challenge; I am not a natural wordsmith. I have met scholars who can bash out 5000 words before breakfast, unfortunately I do not fall into this category!

The 5th to the 10th March is marked as National Careers Week, in advance of this a number of speakers have worked with students during our assembly time. My thanks to those visitors who have come into school. The subtext to many of these talks has been about finding a career that excites the spirit. I have always believed that there is something in following your dreams.

Education and qualifications are very important, they provide youngsters with choice and opportunity but they do not  provide the armour plate youngsters need against the headwinds of life.  A youngster’s future  will be influenced by the qualifications they have, but not set by them.  What will influence a youngster’s future and certainly get them out of the starting blocks, is the level of faith parents  have in him or her.  What message does it send if we pour water on a youngster’s passion, dreams and aspirations? 

A few times every year my Senior Team have a one-to-one with KS4 students to talk about careers and aspiration. Do we tell students to pursue their passions or dilute their aspirations with a dose of adult scepticism? Live their dreams or live in reality? What do you do when a student tells you they want to be the next Chris Boardman, Jessica Ennnis-Hill, Alan Sugar or Deborah Meaden, or they want to be movie stars, rock stars and games designers.

As a teacher and a dad I go back and forth on the subject of how and when to push youngsters towards or away from certain plans.  Telling youngsters it won’t happen is clearly not true, or we would not have our own grown talent who are at the pinnacle of their game. The danger is that we try and suppress their enthusiasm because we believe we have something better, or have a preconceived idea of the journey a child must take. In the past, many children did what their parents did because this was the envelope of their parent's experiences, which is why families had generations service personnel, plumbers or even priests. A conversation that starts, I think you should become is doomed to failure. The conversation that starts have you considered is more likely to bear fruit. 

The choice for youngsters now bears little significance to that of 30 yeas ago.  Now there are countless career options, more than most of us can keep track of. Youngsters are driven by experiences and role models, they want to be what they see and can imagine. As adults we have a responsibility to provide guidance, but pouring water on something that excites a youngster is not only wrong it can crush self-esteem during the most vulnerable teenage years.

The words of the poem by W B Yates should resonate in our years when we listen to a the dreams and aspirations of our children.

Had I the heavens’ embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams

Matthew Quinn

 

2nd March 2018

‚ÄčThe first half of the spring half term can be brutal, this year subzero temperatures,  students and staff have had their share of flu, and if that was not enough, a school closure have all proved challenging. I find myself counting the minutes until Spring. Thank you to all parents for their support and encouragement on the 1st and 2nd March.  I am particularly grateful to the site team for the work undertaken to keep the site clear on Thursday 1st March. The decision to close on Friday 2nd March was not taken lightly. I knew that somewhere along the line I would upset someone. It is very easy for youngsters and some parents to say, “shut the school”, but I am aware of the issues that this creates for families, particularly those with young children. Equally, our weather is never certain and a decision made 24 hours in advance of a forecast, could prove to be the wrong one. I also have to consider the management of news and information. It is never helpful for this to be disseminated in a piecemeal fashion. Having said all this, I think we got it about right. Thankfully extreme (for the UK) weather events like this occur rarely.

 

 

 

The school production was one of the casualties of the weather. I am very pleased that we are able to continue the school production of Beauty and the Beast. The first night , Wednesday 28th was a resounding success with a standing ovation. For the cast this has been a difficult time however I am sure that the momentum will return next week. The show must go on!

This term we have also experienced a number of staffing issues. I am always delighted when colleagues tell me that they are having a baby. In addition, a number of other colleagues have secured promotion towards the end of the recruitment cycle, this means that we have to find temporary staff. Nationally the recruitment of both temporary and permanent staff into the secondary sector is at crisis point. The government’s own statics confirm that recruitment for secondary school teachers missed its target by some measure. In fact, last year, only 80% of the required number of secondary trainees were recruited, the worst performance since comparable records began seven years ago. In almost every single secondary school subject, targets were missed apart from PE, and History. In some subjects the training targets were missed by over 30%. We are doing all that is reasonable to fill the current vacancies.

 

 

Our lenten journey continues in school. The midpoint is now on the horizon with Laetare Sunday on the 11th March. This week during registration, students reflected on the time Jesus spent in the desert. To help students focus they watched this short video.

Many of you will be aware of the death of Canon Terence ‘Tim’ Healy earlier last month. He was parish priest in Horndean where he celebrated his Golden Jubilee in 2012. He retired from there a few years ago. Whilst at Horndean he regularly visited the school to celebrate Mass with students and staff. I represented the school at his Requiem Mass on the 2nd March.

 

 

February 2018

My assemblies at the beginning of January looked at the subject of Wisdom.

I posed a number of questions asking students to contemplate on the notion of Wisdom. One person who, in my opinion, has this virtue is Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks; a regular on Radio 4’s ‘Thought for the Day’.  I recently sent staff a link to a speech given by him in the House of Lords https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yupkG7NB8w

He addressed the subject of education and its connection with the Jewish story. Reflecting on some of the challenges young people face, there is a genuine importance for both schools and parents to provide a narrative that shapes youngsters into the adults we want them to become.

Storytelling in its most basic form is a means by which one generation passes their narrative on to the next, what they have found to be useful or not.  If the story misses a generation it is lost forever.  There is an indescribable attraction to narrative. Teenagers may not have a preference for a school lesson, but ask them about a favourite book or film, that’s a different story. If you park for a moment the tawdry slice of the teenage social networking traffic, the rest is the transaction of individual stories. So regardless of whether it takes the form of a novel, magazines, theatre, television or social networking  everyone connects with narrative. We find them, we prioritise time to hear them, to connect with them, to share them, regardless of distance or time constraints. We look to stories to encourage us, to make us laugh or cry, to bring life meaning and provide us with heroes to look up to and model our own lives after.

How might this natural attraction be exploited for parents, teachers and learners? More importantly, as Catholics we have responsibility to ensure that God’s story, the Biblical narrative, is brought into our classrooms and our homes.

The narrative we are seeking is one that will supply youngsters not just with facts, but a set of core values onto which they might construct their lives. I would argue this is more important now than it has ever been; in the relatively short time I have been a teacher and a parent, there has been a shift in the availability of knowledge and information - it is both free, all is known and no information can be hidden from youngsters. Teachers and parents are no longer the gatekeepers of learning. Within this context if we don’t give youngsters a story they will find one. If we don’t provide them with healthy characters and heroes, they will seek them out in other places. The challenge in family life and education, will, I suspect, be about who tells what stories to our youngsters.

Fortunately, we have something to hold on to and hold we must. If stories contribute to the way we make sense of our experiences then as a Catholic community we have access to the story by which all other stories are judged, this is the only way to help our youngsters make sense of their experience. It’s a tough ask, but one that we must not shy away from.

The season of Lent provides us with an opportunity to ‘reboot’ our story, living the Gospel every day. Earlier this week I sent all Form Tutors a short video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_--3uVQ_TuA&t=88s ) asking them to use this during registration to tell the story of Lent.

To get to the heart of our story we must examine how Jesus lived. His actions were surprisingly simple; he was constantly embracing the vulnerable. Our attitude must be the same as Jesus

 

 

January 2018

Most of what we take for granted has a fragile beginning:

  1. the first electric light was so dim that a candle was needed to see its socket
  2. Wilbur and Orville Wright's first airplane flight lasted only 12 seconds
  3. the first car travelled 2 to 4 miles per hour and often broke down; carriages would pass them, with their passengers shouting, "Get a horse!".
  4. During its first year, Coca-Cola only sold 400 bottles of coke.

It would be easy to give up when outcomes don’t live up to expectations!

For the last year or so, I have eased up in the gym in preference for going out on my bike.  I am no athlete, and my family question my sanity, but three or four times a week, I am out of the house before school to complete a 30 mile loop.  I know that we have many youngsters in school who swim competitively and they are up equally early to complete their training.  

Whether it is invention, discovery, fitness or competition, achievement and outcome are linked to motivation, drive, persistence and commitment. The bible narrative provides us with a number of examples of characters who had to find similar motivation, often in the face of adversity. Moses fled from Egypt thinking his life was over, but really it had just begun. He was willing to try again and God sent him back to deliver His people from Pharaoh. Peter thought it was ‘game over’ after he denied Christ. But he was willing to get up and go again. Jesus did not stop until he said "It is finished!"

On Thursday 8th January 2018, to celebrate the school’s examination success at A level and GCSE, students in both year groups were presented with their certificates. This year the school invited two speakers. Dr Christopher Dobbs was one of the divers who was involved in the project to recover the Mary Rose. He is now Head of Interpretation at the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth.  Chris’s story, stretching over 37 years, is one of motivation, drive, persistence and commitment. He talked about his journey from university to becoming one of the world’s renowned experts on the Mary Rose project including his experience of diving on the wreck.  During his time on this project, he also talked about his battle against leukaemia.

Students and staff were also privileged to listen to former student David Harrington. He left Oaklands in 2009 to follow a career in music.  He is now a sought after composer, accompanist and musical director.  He has arranged music for Katherine Jenkins as well as for BBC and ITV productions.  David is also the musical director of the popular classical cabaret act ‘All That Malarkey’. David talked fondly of his time at Oaklands and the positive impact that it had on his formation as a musician. He then entertained us on the piano.

As a note of thanks to our speakers, the school, from its charity collections, has made donations to The Mary Rose Charitable Trust on behalf of Chris Dobbs and The Forget-Me-Not Chorus which supports people with dementia and their families through music, on behalf of David.

This term promises to be busy with Year 9 considering their options, Christian Unity Week, the annual Ski Trip and our school production. We also have a large number of students who have stepped forward to be involved in the Faith and Football Enterprise Challenge. I am sure they hope to emulate last year’s winners.

Many Year 13 students have now received university offers. Success at GCSE has proved to be highly valuable for these youngsters in securing places at universities all over the country.  A number of students have also received unconditional offers.  In addition to University places, a number of students have also secured high quality apprenticeships.

Can I wish all students the best of luck with the rest of this term.